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(410) 866-7111

David B. Love


(410) 866-7111


7717 Philadelphia Rd
Baltimore, MD 21237


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Frequently Asked Questions

1What is a Lawyer?

A lawyer is someone who provides legal advice and counsel on behalf of someone involved in a legal dispute or legal issue. Also called attorneys or counselors, lawyers typically represent people before a governing body (such as a court) by conducting legal research, gathering relevant documents and witnesses, drafting written briefs, presenting oral arguments, and negotiating legal rights and responsibilities of their clients.

2What are a lawyer's primary responsibilities?

Lawyers, by virtue of a state's bar admission, are expected to both uphold the law and protect the rights of their clients. In addition to actually knowing the law, particularly within his or her practice area, an attorney must be able to communicate clearly with their clients, work competently to resolve their clients needs, and be ethical in the performance of their overall handling of a case.

3What do lawyers do . . . Do they spend most of their time arguing cases in court?

The practice of law is more than just appearing in court on behalf of a client. While there are many lawyers who argue cases before a judge, there are just as many lawyers who never step foot in a courtroom. But whether in or out of court, lawyers spend a great deal of time in an office handling a variety of tasks pertaining to their clients case - such as researching new developments in the law, preparing legal documents, and giving legal advice.

4I am facing criminal charges . . . Do I need a lawyer and when should I get one?

If you are arrested, you have the right to use the telephone at the police station to call your family, a friend, or a lawyer. You also have the right to talk to an attorney before answering any questions. If you receive a summons to appear in court for arraignment on criminal charges, you will have time to contact a lawyer and consult with him or her before your court date. If you do hire a lawyer, he or she should go to court with you to participate in your arraignment.